WATCHING YOUR KIDS

Posted on: Apr 14, 2013 at 12:13
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The nation’s leading homeschooling organization is warning parents that the federal government is advancing its aim of identifying and tracking students throughout their school careers, from birth through college graduation.

In an online statement, William Estrada, director of federal relations for the Home School Legal Defense Association, acknowledged statistics on student achievement are helpful to researchers and parents.

But there’s really no need for the government to track such data, he insisted.

“A national database of student-specific data is very concerning for many reasons,” he wrote. “The national databases being created now include detailed records of students, including race, gender, birth information, learning disabilities, detailed academic records, and much more. This information is being collected soon after birth, all the way through graduation from college.”

Estrada said the more personal the information, “the greater the danger to the student’s privacy and safety if the data is breached.”

“Will certain data make it harder for students to get into higher education? Will it be disclosed to government employers, or even private employers?” he asked.

He said HSLDA believes “each student is unique, with far more to offer society than just the sum of their academic years.”

“Government tracking students from soon after birth until they graduate from college is Orwellian and seems like a ‘Big Brother’ mentality, and has no place in a free society,” he said.

Estrada said his organization takes the position “there are very little reasons for the government to track student-specific data.”

WND reported just days ago on a massive $100 million public-school database spearheaded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

The files already contain details such as name, address, Social Security number, attendance, test scores, homework completion, career goals, learning disabilities, hobbies and attitudes on millions of public school students.

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