AT LAST-THANK YOU JUDGE BENSEN

Posted on: Mar 06, 2012 at 01:31
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BALTIMORE (AP) — Maryland's requirement that residents show a â€"good and substantial reason” to get a handgun permit is unconstitutional, according to a federal judge's opinion filed Monday.

States can channel the way their residents exercise their Second Amendment right to bear arms, but because Maryland's goal was to minimize the number of firearms carried outside homes by limiting the privilege to those who could demonstrate â€"good reason,” it had turned into a rationing system, infringing upon residents' rights, U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg wrote.

â€"A citizen may not be required to offer a `good and substantial reason' why he should be permitted to exercise his rights,” he wrote. â€"The right's existence is all the reason he needs.”

Plaintiff Raymond Woollard obtained a handgun permit after fighting with an intruder in his Hampstead home in 2002, but was denied a renewal in 2009 because he could not show he had been subject to â€"threats occurring beyond his residence.” Woollard appealed, but was rejected by the review board, which found he hadn't demonstrated a â€"good and substantial reason” to carry a handgun as a reasonable precaution. The suit filed in 2010 claimed that Maryland didn't have a reason to deny the renewal and wrongly put the burden on Woollard to show why he still needed to carry a gun.

â€"People have the right to carry a gun for self-defense and don't have to prove that there's a special reason for them to seek the permit,” said his attorney Alan Gura, who has challenged handgun bans in the District of Columbia and Chicago. â€"We're not against the idea of a permit process, but the licensing system has to acknowledge that there's a right to bear arms.”

NOTE: Bet it hurt AP to write this result. Judges who uphold the constitution is our only hope.

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